Posts Tagged ‘android’

Hey there! When I’m not playing games on dares or reviewing something on a strict budget, I like to play other games. Like, normally. Stuff I choose of my own volition. I wanna talk about them. So… I’m gonna do that. Now.

pkmnshffl

Pokemon Shuffle (3DS)

This game is cool. If you’ve played the Pokemon Trozei games or Doctor Who: Legacy or most any other “match-3” games, you’ll be familiar with the concept. It’s a free download from the eShop. Nintendo is dipping their toes into the free-to-play and microtransaction waters, but it’s cool. Whatever. Just don’t spend money on it and you’re cool. The energy system probably keeps you from playing too long anyway. It’s Nintendo’s roundabout way of saying “Take a break and get some air already! Geez!”

gtav1

Grand Theft Auto V (Xbox One)

I had it on 360. Got it for the One. It’s the same game, BUT BETTER! OMG GRAFFICKS U GAIZ!

tinder

Tinder (Android)

They show you a picture of a pretty girl and you have to determine if it’s a spambot or not. I’m not very good at this game.

nbalive15nba2k15

NBA Live 15/NBA 2K15 (Xbox One)

One is absolute unadulterated garbage trash that I wouldn’t wish upon my worst enemies, the other is NBA 2K15.

thecrew

The Crew (Xbox One)

It’s seems like a very ambitious idea. The entire country is your car racing playground. Well, not the ENTIRE country. The map is kinda shaped like America and shrunk down to maybe the size of Ohio? I don’t know. I’m still in the starting area of Detroit, or an actually decent facsimile of Detroit. Downtown Detroit in this game actually does look similar to the real Downtown Detroit. Even Comerica Park (sorry, America Park) is well represented. I have a feeling that this will be similar to a racing game from a few years ago called “Fuel.” The central hubs will be well done, but the areas in between will be sparsely detailed. The racing itself is not bad, it doesn’t control the greatest, but I’ve played worse.

elliptical

The Elliptical Machine At My Local YMCA (Real Life)

People thought Wii Fit was a workout! This thing works out your arms and legs at the same time! Looking forward to setting some high scores on this one!

nesremix

NES Remix 1 & 2 (Wii U)

These games are both fantastic. Nintendo takes some of their classic 8-bit games and turns them into mini-game challenges. I would like to see Nintendo reach out to their 3rd party partners and get some more games into the 3rd installment. Konami and Capcom had some fantastic NES games.

mariokart

Mario Kart… All of Them (All the Nintendos)

I love Mario Kart. I’m starting a Mario Kart team. Join me.

Thanks for reading!

Wikipedia

Wikipedia

When I moved to a new school to start off 1st Grade, my teacher had me fill out a new student worksheet so they could hang it in the hallway to introduce me to the rest of the school. One of the questions was “what do you want to be when you grow up?” No one had ever asked me that. I was only 6 years old. I chose something on the spot: race car driver. It seemed relatively normal for a 6-year-old to pick. Some other the other new kids said army guy or princess. Race car driver was a safe choice. But I knew in my heart I had a greater destiny. I wanted to be the 3rd Mario Brother. My (totally platonic) love affair the mustachioed Italian plumber runs deep. At 27 years old, Mario and I have been maintaining a gamemance for nearly 25 years and counting. I get geeked about new Mario game releases just as much as a kid. Girlfriends have had to deal with my irrational exuberance when E3 rolls around and Shigeru Miyamoto via translator Bill Trinen debuts Nintendo’s hot new ware. When said hot new ware releases and I get my hands on it… it’s, well… good. But for about the last 8 to 10 years, something has felt missing from the core Mario releases. New Super Mario Bros. certainly feels new, but I think therein lies the problem. It’s new, not old, which is what this retro gamer is used to.

Wikipedia

Wikipedia

I make no bones about saying my favorite game of all-time is Super Mario Bros. 3 on the NES. It’s a fun game and still incredibly challenging after all these years. I still get an incredible sense of satisfaction after beating it because of the trials and tribulations of taking Mario through World 8 (especially the latter half of it, woof). I have great memories of playing this game as a child and watching others play it. But it makes me wonder, is Super Mario Bros. 3 my favorite game because it’s such a great game? Or is my undying love for it because I have such treasured memories of days past? I mean, it’s not exactly a stretch for someone to choose SMB3 as their favorite game. It is one of the best-selling games of all-time after all. But one of my earliest memories is watching my dad play it. My dad these days is absolutely NOT a gamer. I’m not even sure he’s touched a video game since I tried to get him to play NASCAR Thunder 2003. Even then, he probably hadn’t played a game since the early 90s. But I have such a vivid memory of watching him go through the second fortress on World 5 (the one that connects to the sky portion of that particular map). Maybe I’m looking into this too much, but could my love of Super Mario 3 be a result of it being, as far as I’m concerned, one of two video games I’ve ever seen my dad play? My dad and I never had a really close relationship. Could I be involuntarily holding on to this cherished memory by continually playing this game in the hopes of one day tossing my dad the second controller because I desire a closer relationship with my father? Yikes, this is getting a little deep for me. But this is only an explanation for one game, my favorite game. What about the other oldies?

Moby Games

Moby Games

Everyone has their reasons for being a retro gamer. Some may be hard pressed to find a reason for being a retro gamer other than “because it’s fun.” Well, of course it’s fun. You enjoy things that you find fun. But I want to go deeper. It may seem a bit self-serving, but I’m doing this introspective into my own head because I want to learn more about me. Maybe by doing this I can learn about others, but for now, I want to share my results with the world. One theory I came up with is how my post-high school life has been treating me. Adulthood has definitely had its share of ups and downs for me. I’ve faced the highest of highs and the lowest of lows. It perfectly matches my senior yearbook quote of “Life is like a rollercoaster. It’s scary.” Perhaps because my adult life has been less than desirable for the majority of my 20s, I’ve been holding on to childhood memories to remind myself of happier times. What better way to relive those memories than with the one constant in my life?

GameFAQs

GameFAQs

When I was living with an emotionally and mentally abusive girlfriend, my gaming room was my escape. For a small block of time, I was able to block her out and go back to a time where my feet didn’t touch the floor when I sat on the couch. I could sit in the basement and pretend I was 9 years old all over again. When a different girlfriend left me and I sat alone in an empty apartment, I picked up my 3DS and started speedruns on the copy of Super Mario Bros. I downloaded from the eShop. I didn’t have much, but I had the pure unadulterated elation of beating Super Mario Bros. without not just dying, but not even getting hit by an enemy. When I had a bad day at work and just wanted to yell and scream and ask whatever supreme being is in the sky “why?” I would go home, fire up my Nintendo, and take it out on the pixilated baddies. Ha! Take that goomba-who-is-an-8-bit-representation-of-that-customer-that-really-pissed-me-off-today! Okay, this seems to me that all I’m talking about is Mario. I mean, I played a lot of Mario as a kid as well as other series, but how does that account for my collection and love of retro games that I’ve only recently discovered?

GameFAQs

GameFAQs

When I originally started Five Dollar Gamer, I had not really started my retro gaming collection. I was mostly collecting games that I had as a kid, recovering what had been stolen from me in what I refer to as “The Great Nintendo Heist of 2000.” I managed to build that collection back up and then some, but Five Dollar Gamer started when my curiosity was piqued by a $2.99 Super Nintendo game. As a result of this almost 2-year venture, I have amassed nearly 100 “new” games to add to my collection. But what do I find so appealing about these games? These are not games that were a part of my childhood. But a lot of the time, these games hit the right mental notes. I had so much fun playing Solar Striker on the Game Boy, a game I only found out existed hours before the first time I ever played it. I feel it’s because of the similarities of the games I’m used to playing. The race for the high score, the simplicity, and the imagination required to craft your own story. Today’s games have the story spelled out for you. While sometimes that’s pulled of masterfully like in Bioshock or Grand Theft Auto V, for me, the kid who wanted to be the third Mario Brother, a little imagination goes a long way when enjoying an older game.

Wikipedia

Wikipedia

I don’t want this to come off as I only play old video games when my life is being shitty and I need it as a crutch to not fall further or a ladder to try to climb out. I play it during the happy times too. Everyone loves reminiscing and telling stories from the past. It’s just something that people do when they get together after not seeing each other for a while. We tell old stories. “Hey, remember that one time…?” For some social circles, “Hey, remember that one time…?” could mean “Hey, remember that one time we played 4-player Mario Kart 64 at your mom’s house?” Next thing you know, you and friend are huddled around the TV playing Mario Kart 64 and bringing up more stories. As a result of Five Dollar Gamer, I’ve got to hear from many readers who will suggest a game for me and tell me a story about how awesome it was as a kid, or someone will leave a comment on a game I wrote about sharing a story. It’s awesome.

Wikitroid

Wikitroid

Retro gaming unites us. It’s so easy to hop online nowadays and connect with a faceless gamer on the other side of the world. But where’s the camaraderie in that? How many people honestly wax nostalgically while sitting in a lobby while waiting for the next Call of Duty deathmatch to start? Hell, how many people are even sharing a laugh when they’re playing against nothing but strangers? Can you imagine if you took four strangers from a deathmatch lobby, sat them on a couch, and had them play Mario Kart? There would be a lot less swearing, name calling, and insult flinging. Sure, there’d likely be some, but not to the degree that you hear when hiding behind the wall of anonymity, and I bet it’d be a hell of a lot more light-hearted. There would be more sharing of stories and of good times past. Get four strangers on a couch. Put a controller in their hands. They’ll find common ground.

Giant Bomb

Giant Bomb

I think the notion that older games aren’t fun is silly. Everyone, one way or another, is nostalgic about the past. Nostalgia transcends different mediums. It’s why your parents listen to classic rock and oldies. It’s why your neighbor takes his ‘67 Ford Mustang to the car show every summer. It’s why you just bought that Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles shirt from TeeFury. It’s not necessarily because it’s better. It’s what you grew up with, it’s what you know. When two 10-year-old kids walked into a GameStop I was working at once, a coworker and I happened to be testing a Nintendo Wii. We were playing the NES version of Punch-Out!! that someone had downloaded from the Virtual Console. One kid asked us how it could be possible that this game could be fun. I asked him to clarify. He says “Well, look at the graphics! They’re horrible!” 21-year-old me was angered by his statement. How dare this snot-nosed brat shit on my childhood with his naïve statement! But 27-year-old me can look back at this incident with wiser eyes. All this child knew was realistic 3D graphics. His line of questioning wasn’t malicious in nature. He was just curious why I was riding a bike when I have a car in the garage. He wasn’t old enough to be nostalgic. Maybe when he’s 21 he’ll be feeling nostalgic about Spyro the Dragon (or more likely Grand Theft Auto IV) in the same way I’m nostalgic about Punch-Out.

Video Disc Things/Tumblr

Video Disc Things/Tumblr

In writing this, I’ve learned so much about myself in regards to my treasured hobby. I desire to be a happy person. I desire to make those in my life happy. Retro gaming makes me happy, so naturally it’s something I want to share with others. I’ve come to the conclusion that it’s not something I like because I’m trying to desperately cling to my youth as I continue to climb in age. It’s just fun. It’s a hobby. It’s partly nostalgia, but not fully. I can have just as much fun with a Super Nintendo game I discovered just recently as I can with one I played when I was 10. I can also have as much fun with a AAA Xbox title from 2013 as I can with an obscure Game Boy game from 1990. Right now, NES Kirby’s Adventure is getting equal attention with Fire Emblem: Awakening on my 3DS. For me gaming transcends the decades. It’s a timeless hobby. The question remains: am I, or anyone else, retro gamers because we play mostly retro games or our collections are mostly retro games? Or are we just gamers?

discozoo

source: touchtapplay.com

OS: Android (also available on iOS)

Price: Free (supported by in-app purchases, unobtrusive ads)

I’ve always loved going to the zoo. The opportunity to see animals other than squirrels or my roommate’s cat has always been one I’ve jumped on. I’ve already been to my local zoo twice this year with several more trips planned. But sadly, these two trips were my first zoo trip of any kind in 3 years and my first trip to this zoo in particular in 8 years. I’m making 2014 the year of the zoo. I have plans not only to visit my local zoo several more times, I also have plans to do a sort of zoo road trip. From Grand Rapids (my hometown) to Louisville, Kentucky (where I have family) and any zoo in between.

I'm sure this zoo is "just for children" in the same way the My Little Pony reboot is "just for children." (image source: findthebest.com)

I’m sure this zoo is “just for children” in the same way the My Little Pony reboot is “just for children.”
(image source: findthebest.com)

Sadly, Disco Zoo is not a zoo that will be on this road trip. In fact, it’s not a real zoo at all. It’s a game! For your phone! That you probably have!

Pictured: Ubiquity (image source: blackchilled.com)

Pictured: Ubiquity
(image source: blackchilled.com)

In Disco Zoo you are tasked with running your own zoo. Congratulations! You are the proud owner of an empty zoo! So what do you do to fill your zoo with Earth’s finest creatures? You go rescue them yourself! There are 8 different regions/climates/eras to search for animals to fill your zoo: Farm, Outback, Savannah, Northern, Polar, Jungle, Jurassic, and Ice Age. Only the Farm is unlocked from the get-go. The others become available after your zoo meets certain size requirements. The animals at your zoo earn you coins, which are then used to fund your rescue expeditions for more animals. Rescues are performed in what, at first, looks like a cross between a match-3 and memory game. Each animal is represented by a pattern of 3 or 4 squares hidden under tiles on a 5×5 grid. Once you uncover all of that animal’s tiles, that animal is added to your zoo. For instance, the pig’s pattern is a 2×2 square, so once you uncover one pig tile, the other tiles are pretty close. You get 10 tries per rescue attempt to uncover as much as you can. Some tiles may contain coins or Discobux, the in-game virtual currency.

Pictured: More ubiquity.

Pictured: More ubiquity.

As you add animals to your zoo, they earn you more and more coins per minute. BUT! There’s a catch. Each group of animals has a sleep timer. They’ll only earn you coins if they’re awake. You’ll have to check in on them every once in a while and wake them up so they can continue entertaining your zoo patrons.

An obvious allegory to the drudges of real life. (image source: telegraph.co.uk)

An obvious allegory to the drudges of real life.
(image source: telegraph.co.uk)

What exactly, though, makes this a DISCO Zoo? Why the random disco dance parties of course! For a price starting at one Discobux, you can throw a disco party, which turns your whole zoo into Studio 54 (sans alcohol and hard drugs). During the disco party, a disco ball, flashing lights, and music permeate the area. The benefit to you, the owner, is that your animals will generate twice as many coins per minute. 1 Discobux gets you a 1-minute party, 10 Discobux gets you an hour, whereas 50 Discosmackers gets you 8 hours of dancin’ goodness! Also, starting a Disco Party will automatically wake up all your animals! Convenient!

The TOTALLY REAL AND EXISTING Unicorns are moneymakers during dance time.

The TOTALLY REAL AND EXISTING Unicorns are moneymakers during dance time.

This game is a load of fun and recommend it for anyone that… well… likes fun? While the Discobux are purchasable with real world money, the opportunity to earn bux in the game is plentiful. The ads pop up super rarely (I see one ad maybe once every two days) and are generally non-obtrusive. Give this app a look and build your majestic dancey zoo today!

Download on Google Play

Download on iTunes App Store

Thanks for reading!

 

docwholegcover

OS: Android (also available on iOS)

Price: Free (supported by in-app purchases, no ads)

DISREGARD THIS IS THE FIRST ARTICLE IN OVER 4 MONTHS

DISREGARD! DISREGARD!

DISREGARD! DISREGARD!

On January 6th, 2013 I had no idea what Doctor Who was. Two months, the loss of a job, and a Netflix subscription later, I embarked on a journey to watch all of Doctor Who. I marathoned 6 seasons in a week. Nowadays, barring the latest Christmas special, I’m all caught up. So, in my quest to become completely engrossed in the fandom of Doctor Who, I embarked on a mission to find some Doctor Who video game goodness! Surely there was a great Doctor Who game floating around out there!

...

Nothing. That is, until Doctor Who: Legacy was gifted to us from the wonderful people at Tiny Rebel Games and Seed Studio! Doctor Who: Legacy is a match-3 puzzle/RPG game tasking you with building a team of a Doctor of your choosing with up to 6 companions, ranging from the familiar (Amy Pond, River Song) to the… bit more obscure… (the kids Clara babysat).

The literal bottom of the barrel was scrapped early in development.

The literal bottom of the barrel was scrapped early in development.

Each Doctor and character has a color that corresponds to them. Match 3 or more of that color and each character using that color will do damage to your enemies (Daleks, Cybermen, etc). Pink refills health of course. This all plays into the strategy of how you build your team. Do you try to max out one color and do slower, but more damaging, attacks? Or do you vary it up for quicker, but weaker attacks?

On the left: Selecting the team to be sent to their doom. On the right: The Doctor pulling victory out of his ass again.

On the left: Selecting the team to be sent to their doom.
On the right: The Doctor pulling victory out of his ass again.

In typical RPG fashion, you gain XP to level up your characters, which of course makes them stronger. The cool thing is you can go back and play older episode to level up newer companions you unlock. This is useful if you don’t want to be stuck with the starting set the whole time (which I currently am… because I’m too lazy to go back to level up newer characters… shut up).

The starting set, in mid-attack. They're all-powerful gods in my game right now.

The starting set, in mid-attack. They’re all-powerful gods in my game right now.

Bottom line, this isn’t your typical match-3 game. The strategy it takes to succeed here is something you can’t get from Bejeweled or Candy Crush. Phooey on them! If you’re a Doctor Who fan with a smartphone, this is a no-brainer

Google Play

iTunes

Facebook

Twitter

Thanks for reading!

 

 

 

wtp

 

OS: Android (also available on iOS)

Price: Free (supported by in-app purchases, somewhat intrusive ads)

Wheel of Fortune is such a simple game. Spin the wheel, say a letter, get paid. It’s a great concept and so easy, a grade-schooler can grasp the finer points of it!

And they did sometimes!

And they did sometimes!

This is why it was such a no-brainer for Zynga, purveyors of simple, no-brainer games to create their own take on Wheel of Fortune called What’s the Phrase?! (or WTP for short). WTP lets you connect with other random users and compete to be the first to solve a word puzzle. The person with the highest point total after 3 rounds is declared the winner! The puzzles are based in several categories. But these aren’t Pat Sajak’s categories! Some categories have a modern day take on them, like First World Problems, Video Games, and Things That Suck.

Do you think "Internet Memes" is itself a puzzle under "Things That Suck?"

Do you think “Internet Memes” is itself a puzzle under “Things That Suck?”

Some categories, like the aforementioned Video Games, are unlockable, using coins. Coins can be earned slowly via gameplay, or being that this is a free-to-play game, purchased straight-up with cold hard cash.

First World Problem puzzle: Wa_ted Re_l Money On _tupid Virtu_l _urren_y.

First World Problem puzzle: Wa_ted Re_l Money On _tupid Virtu_l _urren_y.

Of course, if you don’t want to play against the faceless masses of the internet, you can link your Facebook profile, and get embarrassed by that girl you had a crush on in college you haven’t talked to in years because you didn’t know the proper spelling of “The Berenstain Bears” when attempting to solve the puzzle.

 

"How could you not know that 'S____ _____ ___s' was 'Super Mario Bros?' I am SO glad I didn't date your dumb ass!"

“How could you not know that ‘S____ _____ ___s’ was ‘Super Mario Bros?’ I am SO glad I didn’t date your dumb ass!”

I do have some complaints about this game, that don’t really have anything to do with the gameplay itself. Namely, the ads. The first two articles I wrote for FDG Mobile featured no ads and very little ads, respectively. This one has ads that not only pop up between rounds and games, but on occasion, will cause the game to lock up (luckily not causing the phone to lock up). I’m not certain if this also happens with the iOS version but some other Android users, according to reviews in the Play Store, seem to be experiencing the same issues.

If you’re willing to take the chance with these ad bugs, then take What’s the Phrase for a spin for your free Wheel of Fortune fix!

G__gle Pla_ St__e 

iT_nes

Fa_eb__k

T_itte_

Tha_k_ f_r Rea_i_g!

nimble quest

 

OS: Android (also available on iOS)

Price: Free (supported by in-app purchases, very limited ads)

The game of Snake is almost as old as the PC itself. Anyone who had to use a graphing calculator in high school should be familiar with Snake. It’s an easy to make game that has been replicated nearly as many times as Tetris. If you hadn’t played it on your calculator in class when you were supposed to be knocking out some algebraic equations, you either didn’t have a graphing calculator or you actually liked math class.

Many a student heard "Hey, get back to work!" while viewing this screen.

Many a student heard “Hey, get back to work!” while viewing this screen.

So how do you evolve a simple, classic game like Snake? Tetris reinvented itself with countless sequels. Tetris 2, Tetris Blast, Tetrisphere, Tetris Attack, and so on and so forth all brought something new to the Tetris table.

...

The Tetris table.

So who would jump at the chance to make Snake an everlasting and beloved gaming series? Constantly evolving and changing things up when things were getting stale? Anybody? Seriously, anyone want to take a shot at glory? Well, it seems many were content with leaving Snake in its very basic form. Sure, you may fancy up the graphics a bit, but it is essentially the same game. Like the HD remakes of our favorite Sony games or 3D re-releases of movies we’ve watched countless times, new graphics don’t essentially change the experience. Let’s say you own a house. The paint on the outside of it is royal blue. You decide to change it to sky blue. Yes, you’ve given the house a new coat of paint, but you haven’t changed anything on the inside and you still live in a blue house.

...with a blue little window and a blue Corvette...

…with a blue little window and a blue Corvette…

So in 2013, NimbleBit takes it upon themselves to do what no-one did for decades: take the game Snake and make something really awesome. How do you do that? NimbleBit says you take a whole Snake, add in a dash of RPG elements, a pinch of delightful retro graphics that everyone loves, melt in some buttery-smooth controls, bake in an iOS or Android dev unit for a while and you get: NIMBLE QUEST!

No actual snakes were harmed in the making of this game... that I know of.

No actual snakes were harmed in the making of this game… that I know of.

Controls are pretty basic. Swipe your finger in the direction you want your ever-growing team to move. You start off with one hero. As you progress through the game you can unlock additional heroes who will join your team and extend your hero train. The heroes will use their attacks to defeat spiders, skeletons, knights, and more as you move to avoid running into them and collect boost items and gems. If you are defeated, you must start back at the beginning, with one hero, but any heroes you have unlocked are available for you to choose to be the leader. Each hero has a different specialty allowing you to choose a hero to play as to suit your style. Among these are sweeping blade attacks, magic fireballs, bullets, arrows, and more. Assisting you are the many items you can pick up to boost your attack speed, freeze enemies, give you a protective shield, or a magnet to attract gems to you. You may also use NimbleBit’s currency (represented by large gold coins) used across their games to help you.

nqscreen2

Frozen enemies and copious amounts of gems. Pictured: Success.

Gems are used to increase the effectiveness or duration of these boosts or they can be used to immediately level up one of your heroes. Each hero has 3 levels, each increasing a certain stat like attack speed or armor. Increasing these levels can be done without the use of gems, but it takes quite a long time, although the amount of gems needed is quite high as well.

Just like when you went to the bar last weekend, you will spend too much money here.

Just like when you went to the bar last weekend, you will spend too much money here.

This game is addicting. I haven’t played an Android game this addicting since I discovered… well, anything made by Kairosoft (if you’re familiar with any of their “_____ Story” games, you know what I mean). My only complaint is that on rare occasions your movement swipe will either not register or move you in a direction you didn’t intend to go in. The ads aren’t intrusive at all. Nothing will appear during gameplay or on the menus. The only thing that will pop up is a very rare full screen ad when going back to the character select screen after a death. Even then, it’s only for one of NimbleBit’s other games.

Bottom line: Like classic gameplay with a modern twist all at the low, low price of nothing? Check out Nimble Quest today, you Android or iPhone having gamer! The links below will bring you to the version of your choice!

Google Play (Android)

iTunes (iOS)

Also, check me out on Facebook or Twitter! I post more on Twitter, but articles get posted to Facebook… sooo… I don’t know how to end this…

Run away!

Run away!

 

pocket planes

OS (Operating System): Android (also available on iOS)

Price: Free (supported by in-app purchases, no ads)

Alrighty! Well, since the servers hosting my online coursework are down, I suddenly have some free time! Why not introduce Five Dollar Gamer Mobile?! No, I will not be selling you a smartphone. I don’t have the network capabilities. If I did, forget 4G, you’d be lucky to get -7G.

Our latest product!

Our latest product!

Rather, FDG Mobile will focus on smartphone games! Usually these will be games I’ve played before and rather than playing them blind for the blog like I do with the main series, I’ll just be picking out ones I like and enjoy (no negativity here!). Therefore, no score will be given afterwords. If it’s featured here, it means I liked it.

*-Even you, dear reader!

*-Even you, dear reader!

I’ve played a game in the past from Pocket Planes developer NimbleBit before. Tiny Tower was a tower building sim… kinda. It had nice, pixly graphics and a simple concept. Add floors, attract tennants and businesses, micro-manage them. Boom. Simple. What I really liked is it didn’t require your constant attention. You could go a week without playing it and you can pick up right where you left off. You wouldn’t be making additional money from your businesses since you need to restock them, but nothing would deteriorate. So I had high hopes going into Pocket Planes.

Pocket Planes tasks you with running and maintaining an airline. You buy planes (cargo, passenger, or a combo plane), color them how you wish, name the flight, choose destinations, and grow to become the #1 world airline! You start off by selecting your region. I chose the southwest United States, which gives you the 3 starting cities of San Diego, Las Vegas, and Phoenix. Phoenix! Exciting!

Destination: Grandma's house!

Destination: Grandma’s house!

Select the passengers and cargo you want to send to one of the other 2 cities you have available and build up enough profit to unlock other cities. Opening other cities allows you to expand your operations and attract more passengers and shipments. The further a destination, the bigger the payday. But you’ll need better planes to make longer flights. Or you can connect via other cities to reach your destination. For instance, you have a flight from San Francisco to Orlando. A better plane can make the flight in one shot, or a smaller plane might have to connect via Phoenix, Houston, and New Orleans before reaching Orlando. If this is the case, it might be wise to also include a passenger along this flight path. It’s a neat element of strategy that doesn’t require critical thinking, but it’s not exactly mindless tapping. A brain is still required to play.

Pictured: Minimum System Requirements

Pictured: Minimum System Requirements

As you grow your airline empire you’ll be able to unlock bigger and better planes and eventually take on overseas flights. I personally haven’t made it that far, but I’ve got nearly the entire U.S. on lockdown. You wanna fly from your hovel in Detroit to a grilled food convention in Denver? You have to go through Five Dollar Airlines! Your shanty in Cincinnati to your clown college in Portland? Five Dollar Airlines! Download this game and micromanage your airline today!

Google Play (Android) store link: Click Here!

iTunes Store (iOS): Click Here!

My Facebook: Click Here!

My Twitter: Click Here!

Thanks for reading!